by Michelle Heng

January 4, 2011
By the ZippyCart Shopping Cart Reviews Content Team

Move over Shakeweight, the latest trend in fitness dominating 2011 looks to be “exergaming,” the combination of exercise and video gaming. With only a handful of days into the New Year, a shift immediately has occurred in what consumers are looking to purchase. This is a time when people are so committed to sticking with their New Year’s resolutions, it causes those spending habits and product trends for 2011 to also follow the quest to achieve those new goals. As usual, weight-loss is at the top of many people’s lists after the marathon of holiday feasting has subsided, normally causing a surge in new gym memberships, but this time around, people are flocking to buy fitness themed video games.

Once an activity associated to couch potatoes and perhaps, a factor in the increase of childhood obesity, the wave of free motion gaming is taking bodies to another level. With popular consoles like Nintendo’s Wii and Wii Fit, Sony’s PS3, and Xbox 360’s Kinect offering this type of gaming, Amazon’s Best Selling Video Game list is now being topped by fitness centric games including: Just Dance 2, Your Shape Fitness Evolved, Dance Central, and EA Sports Active 2. The appeal to exergaming has become increasingly popular because it serves as an easy beginning for stagnant bodies to transition into moving ones as many of these games simulate sports and dancing. Gamers looking for proper motivation to get off the couch can also find the benefit of a virtual personal trainer at home. Gamers can train with Jillian Michaels, in her Fitness Ultimatum 2011, making losing weight a little more fun and gives easy access to tracking their physical progress. People don’t normally associate a killer body with video gaming but most of these games do assure better balance, weight loss, and an improvement in health.

The Pew Internet & American Life Project revealed that 97 percent of American children play videogames and 53 percent of the adults play computer games. Studies have shown exergaming requires more than twice as much energy as traditional video games and that they raised children’s activity levels enough to meet health guidelines for a moderate-intensity activity.

Is this exergaming craze the answer to obesity? Probably not, but for the percentage of people owning and playing video games, exergames have people doing more than just sitting and twitching their thumbs. The bottom line to the exergame craze, it is a much better alternative to doing nothing and may be the one time when spending too much time in front of the TV is actually a good thing.

To see how exergames can help keep your kids active, head over to Exergame Fitness and checkout the largest supply chain in active gaming products!